A Psychologist is asking game developers to alter their games to help players who have video game addiction problems. Video Game Addiction: Are Developers to Blame?

Here is an excerpt from the original story that this commentary is based off of from Eurogamer

A cyber psychologist has called on the developers of massively multiplayer online role-playing games to help prevent addiction by tweaking their design.

Dr Zaheer Hussain, a lecturer in psychology at the University of Derby, called on MMORPG designers to look into the structure of their games, and suggested shortening long quests.

The recommendation was made in “Social responsibility in online video gaming: What should the videogame industry do?”, a new study authored by Dr Hussain, Dr Shumaila Yousafzai from the Cardiff Business School and Professor Mark Griffiths, of Nottingham Trent University and director of the International Gaming Research Unit.

The study, published in the Addiction Research and Theory journal, recommended developers reconsider the structure of their games in order to avoid government intervention of a kind seen in Asia.

The study said some gamers play up to 90 hours a session, developing a “pathological” addiction. A distinction was made between video games with an ending and MMORPGs, which do not. The researchers said around seven to 11 per cent of players were considered “pathological” gamers.

Dr Hussain said: “As a first step online game developers and publishers need to look into the structural features of the game design, for example the character development, rapid absorption rate, and multiplayer features which could make them addictive and or problematic for some gamers.

“One idea could be to shorten long quests to minimise the time spent in the game obtaining a certain prized item.”

In a BBC report, UKIE boss Dr Jo Twist responded to the study, saying: “There is no medical diagnosis of game addiction but like anything enjoyable in life, some people play games excessively.”

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